Are you safe or are you sorry?

Who reads this publication?

Readers include decision makers and managers in the safety, health and environment arena, SHEQ practitioners and officers and various labour and non-governmental organisations. SHEQ MANAGEMENT has an ABC audited figure of 5739, the largest circulated magazine in the field Contact us and subscribe now »

Training guide banner 2016

You are here: Home REGULARS Hints & Tips Are you safe or are you sorry?

Are you safe or are you sorry?

E-mail Print PDF
Are you safe or are you sorry? Very often training that is required by law is regarded as a grudge purchase and the focus is on the minimum requirement. FTS Safety highlights the maximum potential benefit of proper training.

To the person who had cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) performed on him or her while waiting for the ambulance, the maximum potential benefit of proper CPR training is obvious. Could you refuse someone a day’s training when the price of not training could be someone else’s life?

If you own an office building and you find out after a fire that your fire marshal’s certificate has lapsed and that your insurer may refuse your claim, the value of a few hours of training becomes very clear.

Studies show that the correlation between safety and productivity is paramount to profitability. Risk needs to be mitigated at every point in the business process and training is a key component of this.

The importance of the positions required by law – such as safety, health and environment representatives and first aiders – should not be overlooked. These people can be a strategic link between employees and management, and are a vital part of promoting safety culture within your organisation.

Often safety training is regarded as a box to tick when, in fact, it is key to your success. Every action, every day, carries risk. For your company to be the most profitable it can be, all risks need to be covered and all hazards exposed.

A minor hand injury costs your business money, from the second the incident occurs right up until the injured person is fully recovered. To demonstrate the connection, think of each second representing R1 000. Within four to eight seconds of the incident occurring, the cost of the training (that would have prevented the incident) is paid for. Realistically, in a medium-scale construction development each second equates to approximately R4 992.

Retraining every two years is required and recommended. Changes in legislation, production and staff can lead to skills gaps within your business and unnecessary risks being taken. Training is a long-term investment to avoid short-term disaster.

Good quality training is rare. The training that you provide for your staff will impact the business as well as the society in which your staff live. If you or your family need first aid, you would hope that the relevant business owners have invested in proper training.

 
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner

hse_07_15_28267_-sheq_advert_aug_edition