What makes for extraordinary impact gloves?

In an age of abundant information, Stephen Burrow – general manager at Knight Safety Gear – felt it was timely to shine some light on impact gloves

“There are many ‘impact’ gloves on the market, called this simply because they have a piece of foam or rubber stuck across the fingers and the back of the hand,” Burrow points out. “But, truthfully, this in no way means that they are actually impact gloves.”

He adds that in order to receive the EN impact marking, an indication that a product adheres to the European Standard, an impact glove has to pass certain requirements, according to the EN388:2016 Revision. “This means that any glove that claims to be an impact glove should comply with this standard.”

That is precisely why Knight Safety Gear – which supplies personal protective equipment across the United States of America, Canada, Africa and Australasia – decided to opt for Granberg safety gloves.

“The Granberg range has received three accolades from the prestigious German Red Dot Design Award over a two-year period,” Burrow explains. “The hand protection company has ensured that its range of impact gloves not only meets, but exceeds, the requirements of the standard, to ensure the absolute best level of protection for its users.”

The Granberg 115.9003 offers the highest-ranking of cut protection available – cut level F – and is puncture and slash resistant. Lined with Kozane, a high-tech material that offers superb cut and slash resistance, the 115.9003 is dubbed “the toughest of all” by Knight Safety Gear.

“The range also includes the 115.9011, which is a Type A chemical-approved, cut level D impact glove. It’s a unique glove that offers multiple solutions,” says Burrow. “Don’t assume that your gloves are providing adequate protection; make sure that they are EN approved. With Granberg gloves, extraordinary is the new normal – don’t settle for less.”

For more info visit:  www.knightsafetygear.com or send an email to: enquiries@knightsafetygear.com

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